Bookshelf

The bookshelf contains a list of the books that I have found to be very useful or intriguing or educational or all of the above. If you are looking for a personal finance book to read (and you asked me for my opinion) these are the ones that I would recommend to you. As I read more and more books, I reserve the right to add and remove books from this list.

I have posted a link to a detailed review (if I have done one already), a link to see if you can find the book at your local library, and an affiliate link to purchase each book from Amazon.com.

If you have any other books that you would recommend I put on my list or that you would like me to review, I would love to hear your recommendations – please send me an email!

Your Money or Your Life by Joe Dominguez & Vicki Robin

This book completely changed my paradigm for looking at my career as well as how (and why) we work and earn money. Some people are locked into their current job, even though they despise going to work each Monday, because they feel that the job they really want would never enable them to afford their life. This book dares to say that maybe the problem isn’t with your job, but rather with the way you are living your life.

Read BFN’s detailed review

Search for it at your local library

Purchase a copy from amazon.com

The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas Stanley, PhD, and William Danko, PhD

This is another book that really opened my eyes. The authors provide a great deal of information on how wealthy people make money and spend money (not the people who look and act wealthy, but people who are actually wealthy). In doing so, they expose a number of accepted “wealth” beliefs as myths. This book really inspired me to realize that I didn’t need to win the lottery or become a ridiculously overpaid executive to become wealthy; rather, I could achieve wealth through a disciplined lifestyle.

Read BFN’s detailed review

Search for it at your local library

Purchase a copy from amazon.com

The Total Money Makeover by Dave Ramsey

If the previous book was written by statisticians (which it was), this book was definitely written by a radio talk show host. Dave Ramsey’s book is powerful in its simplicity and in providing inspiration. He harps on the dangers of using debt (yes, any kind of debt) and also on what a debt-free life can enable you to do. This book does present a step-by-step financial process for those looking for an inspirational plan to get out of debt and get on track with their finances.

Read BFN’s detailed review

Search for it at your local library

Purchase a copy from amazon.com

Your Money Counts by Howard Dayton

Newest addition to the bookshelf…

Howard Dayton packs an extraordinary amount of Biblical guidance into this skinny little book.  Basically, he attempts to cover what the Bible says about all the main aspects of money and possessions (earning, spending, saving, investing, giving, debt, and more).  It’s a pretty ambitious goal but the author actually does a good job of meeting it.  Of course, he can’t go into much detail on each portion but it is a great introduction to learn about God’s teachings on money, possessions, and prosperity. In each section, he summarizes what the Bible teaches and provides numerous Bible references.  Personally, I feel that these references are the most valuable part of the book.  I feel that this book makes a great reference for Biblical finances and is also a great jumping off point for conducting a personal Bible study on the topic.

Read BFN’s detailed review

Search for it at your local library

Purchase a copy from amazon.com

The Bogleheads’ Guide To Investing by Taylor Larimore, Mel Lindauer, and Michael LeBoeuf

This is an excellent book for someone who wants to learn the basics of investing.  It includes much information about the stock market and especially index mutual funds.  Keep in mind that the authors are teaching an investment philosophy based on a diversified portfolio of low-cost index funds.  They do a great job in the book educating as to why they feel this philosophy is the best one for most normal people.  I wasn’t totally sold on the low-cost index fund strategy when I first started reading this book.  The authors did a good job of explaining some of the issues that I was confused about in a way that made the index fund strategy more understandable and plausible.  If you want to learn why this investment strategy is good, read this book.  If you just want to know some good portfolios to implement this strategy, then read the next book on the list.

Read BFN’s detailed review – part 1 and part 2

Search for it at your local library

Purchase a copy at amazon.com

The Lazy Person’s Guide To Investing by Paul B. Farrell, JD, PhD

I have to be honest, I didn’t really enjoy reading this book all that much. It does deserve a spot on my virtual bookshelf, however, due to the excellent information it contains. Dr. Farrell lists a number of example “lazy portfolios” that he has found and, since I believe such a portfolio is the best way for most people to invest, this is a great resource to use.

Read BFN’s detailed review

Search for it at your local library

Purchase a copy at amazon.com

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